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What questions I shouldn\'t ask in an interview?



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What questions I shouldn\'t ask in an interview?

Pardon me, I have not attend an interview for the past 20 years of my life. Recently, I had attended an interview but I do not know what questions I should or shouldn't ask. Actually I am keen to know what I shouldn't ask.

Can I ask:

When is my next increment in salary?
Yearly bonus?
How long notification before sending in resignation letter?
What are the employee benefits?
Allow to claim everything??

Comments

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Martinsx1

My advice is try not to be the one leading with questions. Allow the person interviewing you to ask the questions and you can follow up with answers. Don't ask anything about your salary increment, I believe any business establishment or company already have it's salary payment policy which they strictly adhere to. So bringing it up means you want to discuss the company running policies before you are even hired. Don't mention resignation or retiring because it's a turn off to any employer.

Good luck,
Martins.



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peachpurple

Martinsx1
Thanks, my teen told me to ask those questions but I dare not ask since I have not got the job yet. Can I ask AFTER I started working there?



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Martinsx1

Once you have secured the job, it would be in your best interest not to start bringing you talks to increased salary or promotion or whatsoever. Just stick with your job and with time the salary increment would happen or if you're in a hurry to know when when it would be done, you can inquire from the old staff to know when they got their salary increments after they were hired.



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emiaj55

I could relate to this. I had a friend who after six months of working is already looking for salary increase. When nothing came, he switch one job after another. Now he is in no steady career switching companies after companies.



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DenisP

Honestly, I completely agree with everything written here. When you're going in for an interview, it's best to let the interviewer remain the interviewer, and you remain the interviewee. Asking questions during an interview can easily be seen as rude or as being over ambitious/arrogant and will most likely hinder your chances of landing the job. I think questions such as salary increments, bonuses, times for letters of resignation, are best saved for once you've already earned your position.



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Martinsx1

Exactly, you must have made your name in the company which hired you and have a good track record from which you can stand on and ask for work bonuses and benefits as well as salary increment. Anything outside these have the possibility of getting your job terminated.



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DenisP

Well concerning benefits, I think that is information that the interviewer should generally be providing up front anyway. Perhaps it is different in certain places, but where I'm from it is the cultural norm to include job benefits upfront as a means of attracting potentially qualified employees. It's sort of a way of enticing people to apply.

But yeah, in terms of bonuses and raises in salary, that is stuff that you only discuss once your foot is in the door.



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Youngshark

Yeeah if you get to ask too much you will only ruin your chances. It could be more advantageous for you if you wait and answer only that which is asked. Focus on giving the right answers and keep the questions to a later date.



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Pixie06

You are absolutely right. It is wise not to ask too much about the monetary rewards. This will leave the interviewer under the impression that you are not interested in the job but only in the salary and they may not hire you for this reason. Furthermore, let's say you finally get the job then you will be required to sign a contract. Maybe at this point you can ask for clarifications about things which don't seem to be clear.



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Martinsx1

".... It is wise not to ask too much about the monetary rewards. This will leave the interviewer under the impression that you are not interested in the job but only in the salary...."

This is very correct, with such questions even even you are yet to be hired, processed and given appointment letter would make the interviewer draw the conclusion that it's all about the money for you instead of the good of the firm hiring you. It's not that the pay isn't part of the deal but it's not wise just like you said not to make it your first point of attention.



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ballyhara

True. More often than not, companies will make you an offer about the salary, so you can have a time period to either take that offer or not. Usually, that offer is based on the average salary for that position, but you can also make your own research about the common earning for it. I recommend to better wait for their offer, and then you can make your own decision.



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Kakashi2020

Citing from my experience you could only ask clarificatory questions during or after the interviewer posts a question. Example if the interviewer asks you if you have any experiences in the job / position your applying for, if you have no experience in that kind of job but has a long and successful experience in another job / position, you can ask the interviewer if you could discuss your other jobs.

Its also good to post some questions after the interview.
This also shows your eagerness for the job.



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Adesuwa08

Your points are really cool, I couldn't write much on mine because I hate 9/5 with annoying bosses I vowed to be an employer not an employee, there is so much to expect from an interview, I recall one of them asking me if I could help him bolt his tie which I did lol.



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peachpurple

Kakashi2020
Yes the interviewer did asked me whether I had any other question to ask her regarding the company which I totally do not know anything about. A different genre of job and line which I had never worked before. So, I didn't ask anything regarding the company. I was keen to know about my benefits.



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Adesuwa08

This isn't a big deal as you think, my personal advice is for you to be quiet and don't act curious to know everything, instead allow them ask and you answer it will make them not think that you are a I Know Too Much kind of person, they always some funny interview questions so you can expect anything.



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peachpurple

Adesuwa08
yup, I kept quiet most of the time. 80% the interviewer asked the questions, I go yes, yes for the 20%



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jennyfermanuel

One thing I learned what is very best when you are applying for a job? Just answer the question they gave you. Never ever add anything irrelevant with the question. Same as, never talk that much when they aren't asking you. Just be cool, if they asked you about what is your previous job, answer it honestly and don't add anything irrelevant with the question. Most of the times you won't get the job if you talk more without asking you to do so. I experienced it my self, I searched it in the internet. That is what I do, I answered only based on what they asked me. It is kind of a mass interview actually, someone is infront of us applicants, she conducts the interview infront all of us. I noticed most of the applicants are answering so much that are too irrelevant with the question. They didn't make it. So I suggest any applicants here to just stay cool, don't ask questions as possible as it is. They are the one's who are supposed to do so. And lastly, answer specifically what is asked only.



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Judas2018

Any questions about future bonuses, raises, salary increases and related items are normally considered bad interview decorum and a huge interview faux pas.



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peachpurple

Judas2018
thanks, so I shouldn't ask about that sensitive questions. Can I ask AFTER I started working then?



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Steve5

I've gone through interviews in the past few months.

I can say that I know how it feels to be the one answering questions. It's best to listen carefully to what they're saying. They'll usually ask about your skills, past experience, and other important stuff they need to know. Just answer honestly and give them enough information as needed. Don't talk too much as it may not leave a good impression.



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Tronia

That is good advice. Just let them talk and lead the conversation. Your main aim is to make them want to hire you and in order to do so, try to read their gestures, mimic, etc.

Don't focus on asking too many questions at once.



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peachpurple

Steve5
Thanks, I need to open up my ears because I always jump into conclusion and never listen properly to questions. I really need to pause and think before I talk



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Barida

Understanding that as the person that is being interviewed, you need to remain calm and ask questions on how we can go far in making the company that you want to work for being better. Ask questions about the next move to take when talking of the company progress and not focusing on what you can benefit from it.



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Judas2018

Agreed. In order to ace an interview, you really need to convince the interviewer/boss/employer that you're there to help the company move forward and improve, first and foremost. It can't be all about you.



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Barida

That was the point that I was trying to make. The thing is that most prospective employees always look at what they will get from the company they are planning work with while forgetting that the main aim the firm is looking for an new staff is for what they can add as value to them. So, if the discover one doesn't care about value to add to the company, they fail yo recruit them.



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DarthHazard

Try not to ask too many questions from the interviewer. And if you do want to ask some questions, try to ask questions related to what you will be doing in the job and not about things such as bonuses, salary increments, break times etc. Those are important questions but you don't want to focus on these too much just in case the interviewer thinks that you are not interested in the actual job and more in the benefits the job brings.



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Barida

I agree with you on the need for us to have questions that is focused on the job that we are getting. One thing that employers don't enjoy is when we focus our questions on our benefits alone and not what we are going to do in order to improve the company's reputation and value.



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Tronia

I think that you are honestly overthinking it. But generally speaking, do not ask anything related to bonuses or things like salary increase. Those are a big no and you should try your best to avoid them.

If you ask that right away or at the wrong time, your employer will assume that all you want is money and nothing else (which can be the case but obviously do not show it). Instead ask questions that will show your interest and passion regarding the job.



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aeon

Right. Don't ever ask about your salary. The interviewer will ask you about that, about your expecting salary.



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Corzhens

You didn't specify what kind of interview it is but I presume that it is for a job application. I have been interviewing applicants to our department and I'd say it is offending to hear what you had listed about salary and bonus. What you should be asking is about the position you are applying for like the official time of work, frequency of overtime, working on weekends. Never mention anything about monetary aspects although you can ask the starting salary. It is also all right to ask about benefits like how many days for the sick and vacation leaves. Let the interviewer add some more to the benefits but don't ask for more details.



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jaymish3

I think you should ask what you want to ask. In my opinion and in my experience people like you, or they don't, no matter what you do, you can't please people enough. My advise would be to ask, anything you want to know, because this may be the place you spend most of your time. If they don't like you because of your questions, I dont think you'll like working there.Have some self esteem!



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Barida

You've got some point with this as the questions that we asked can go a long way in ensuring that they understand the type of person that you are. Trying to pretend in the kind of situation is not really the best way to go.



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Soulwatcher

As others have said I wouldn't be quick to ask about how long that it's going to take you to get a raise. I would ask about health care and vacation time and look them in the eyes the whole time that you talk to them. And be sure to listen to everything that they say because a lot of interviewers will try to get you to mess up, just to see if you're really paying attention to what they say.



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JoeMilford

Do not ask about pay or pay raises in the interview! This could give the impression that you are desperate or that you care more about the pay than you do about being part of a team at the job. They should tell you, if they are interested, what the pay scale will be and, in general, how it works, at the end of the interview. Just listen carefully, and answer their questions honestly, calmly (if you can), and plaintively. Try not to talk too much out of nervousness, and give them the basic answers to their questions with direct and confident specificity.



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bienn05

I agree with Mr. JoeMilford said, everyone should not ask if how much can he earn with the job. We should let the interviewer ask that question. Interviewers are very sensitive and very keen to details so watch out for everything you say. Make sure you are also consistent to everything you are telling him/her. You should always be honest and maintain the eye contact.



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anahbello1206

Well I would suggest that you let your interviewer ask questions about you since you are the one applying for a position in their company. I would also add that you should avoid asking salary, increments and resignation in your first interview because it may give them a negative impression about you. Another is that no matter how nervous you are try to stay calm and natural but still professional.



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treecko142

Do not ask anything about resigning, because the employer may think that you are not dedicated enough for the job which could lower your chances of being picked in the first place. Asking for the benefits is fine since these are basic knowledge that employees must have before working, but asking for future promotion would make you look like you're just after the money.



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EfficientNinja

Yup this could be a red flag already for the interviewer. Knowing that you are interested in resigning would hint that you aren't planning to stay with the company for a long time.

However, you should also try to and look hard to get. In my experience, if I feel or found out that I am overqualified for a position, I will be more aggressive in asking questions, especially about the salary. What questions I shouldn\



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treecko142

Yeah, sometimes it's really good to subtly let the interviewer know that you're also applying to other companies, especially when you have a great resume and background for the job that makes you the top candidate.



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Kakashi2020

I think it's not proper to ask about salary details. The interviewer should be the one to open it up.



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Kakashi2020

These are some questions I've heard being asked by job seekers in the past which are quite wrong in my book.

1.How long would this interview last?
2.Can I have some coffee or water?
3.Can we talk about my package and perks.



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Kakashi2020

I think it's improper to ask the interviewer the number of persons that have been interviewed or the number of applicants being processed. This may result in a low confidence rating.



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aeon

You don't need to think about that. Let the interviewer ask the questions, and all you need is to listen and answer. If the interviewer ask me if for any question. I only ask the interviewer if how long they have been working in this company. that's it.



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MomoStarr16

You can ask them whatever you ask. What you should not ask is a rude question. Have always your question a polite and proper words to let the interviewer that you know how to respect people.



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fishbate

I think it's probably best that you only ask question when you need something to be clear not asking about your job to be. An interview is about you answering to questions regarding work behavior and other personal details. If your are asks about a certain topic that you post then maybe its the right time to answer. What are you asking about is really something you will know after you are hired.



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EfficientNinja

Try to feel interested in the position and show that you are capable of doing the job. Make it also seem like they are not your only option or don't make it seem like you are desperate for the position.

Do not bring up the subject on the money yourself. Wait for them to bring it up. If you feel that they are very interested in you or they can't let you go because of your skills, that could also be a good time to ask about money.



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amoxicilin000

For me since I worked in a specific LOB, for me I set aside my questions during contract signing and during interview I will just answer whatever questions the interviewer asks me. My questions will be asked during the contract signing specially for salary and employee benefits because the Human Resource or that person who is in charge of assisting us has more knowledge for those questions. That's for my LOB. I work in a BPO industry.



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